Strive Tax & Accounting, LLC|IRS Scams|Green Bay

Continually striving for accuracy, excellence and the highest level of integrity.

Strive Tax & Accounting, LLC

PO Box 28353

Green Bay, WI 54324

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American Institute of Certified Public Accountants
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Website Designed by Strive Tax & Accounting, LLC

CPA's specializing in small business tax and accounting with emphasis in construction and manufacturing for corporation and passthrough entities.

IS IT THE IRS OR IS IT A SCAM?

    

REMEMBER: The IRS doesn't initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information. In addition, IRS does not threaten taxpayers with lawsuits, imprisonment or other enforcement action.

   

Scams continue to use the IRS as a lure. These tax scams take many different forms. The most common scams are phone calls and emails from thieves who pretend to be from the IRS. Scammers use the IRS name, logo or a fake web site to try and steal money and even identity from taxpayers.

   

Phone Calls:

   

Taxpayers need to be very cautious of phone calls or automated messages from someone who claims to be from the IRS. Often these criminals will tell the taxpayer he/she owes money. They also demand payment right away. Other times scammers will lie to a taxpayer and say they are due a refund. The thieves ask for a bank account information over the phone. The IRS warns taxpayers NOT to fall for these scams.

IRS employees will NOT:

  • Call demanding immediate payment. The IRS will not call the taxpayer without first sending a bill in the mail.

  • Demand payment without allowing the taxpayer to question or appeal the amount owed.

  • Require the taxpayer pay their taxes a certain way. For example, demand taxpayers use a prepaid debit card or iTunes card.

  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

  • Threaten to contact local police or similar agencies to arrest the taxpayer for non-payment of taxes.

  • Threaten legal action such as a lawsuit.

If a taxpayer doesn’t owe tax or think they don’t owe any tax, they should:

  • Contact the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Use TIGTA’s “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” web page to report the incident.

  • Report the incident to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the “FTC Complaint Assistant” on the FTC.gov. Please add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the comments of your report.

E-mails:

   ​

In most cases, an IRS phishing scam is an unsolicited email that claims to come from the IRS. Criminals often use fake refunds, phony tax bills or threats of an audit. Some emails actually will link you to a web site that looks real. The scammers’ goal is to have the taxpayer click on that link and give up their personal and financial information on the fake web site. If the scammer is successful, they use that information to steal a victim’s money and their identity.

For those taxpayers who get a “phishing” email, the IRS offers this advice:

  • Don’t reply to the message.

  • Don’t give out your personal or financial information.

  • Forward the email to phishing@irs.gov. Then delete it.

  • Do not open any attachments or click on any links. They may have malicious code that will infect your computer.

    ​

Home Visits: ​

The Internal Revenue Service has created a special new page on IRS.gov to help taxpayers determine if a person visiting their home or place of business is from the IRS or an impostor.

​With continuing phone scams and in-person scams taking place, remember IRS employees do make official, sometimes unannounced visits to delinquent taxpayers as part of their routine casework.

The reasons these visits occur and how to verify if it is the IRS knocking at your door fall into three categories:

  • IRS revenue officers will sometimes make unannounced visits to a taxpayer’s home or place of business to discuss taxes owed or tax returns due. Revenue officers are IRS civil enforcement employees whose role involves education, investigation, and when necessary, appropriate enforcement. Be sure to get their business card and credentials before leaving the officer in your home or business.

  • IRS revenue agents will sometimes visit a taxpayer who is being audited. That taxpayer would have first been notified by mail about the audit and set an agreed-upon appointment time with the revenue agent. Also, after mailing an initial appointment letter to a taxpayer, an auditor may call to confirm and discuss items pertaining to the scheduled audit appointment. Be sure to get their business card and credentials before leaving the agent in your home or business.

  • IRS criminal investigators may visit a taxpayer’s home or place of business unannounced while conducting an investigation. However, these are federal law enforcement agents, and they will not demand any sort of payment. Criminal investigators also carry law enforcement credentials, including a badge.

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